China

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China does not recognize cryptocurrencies as legal tender and the banking system is not accepting cryptocurrencies or providing relevant services. The government has taken a series of regulatory measures to crack down on activities related to cryptocurrencies for purposes of investor protection and financial risk prevention. Those measures include announcing that initial coin offerings are illegal, restricting the primary business of cryptocurrency trading platforms, and discouraging Bitcoin mining. In the meantime, China’s central bank is reportedly considering issuing its own digital currency.

China has not passed any legislation regulating cryptocurrencies. Regulators are not recognizing cryptocurrencies as legal tender or a tool for retail payments, and the Chinese banking system is not accepting any existing cryptocurrencies or providing relevant services. In a 2013 circular, the government defined Bitcoin as a virtual commodity, but while warning citizens about the risks of virtual commodities allowed them to freely participate in the online trading of such commodities.

In recent years, especially since September 2017, however, the government has taken a series of regulatory measures to crack down on activities related to cryptocurrencies, mainly due to the concern over financial risks associated with such currencies.

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